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Welcome to Dive Gear Reviews, a comprehensive guide to scuba diving equipment. Scuba diving is an expensive pursuit, so looking up reviews for a particular article of equipment is a wise precaution before investing any hard-earned money in it. However, consumer reviews may or may not be written by an experienced diver, and magazine reviews could be suspect due to the advertising ties of the publication in question. Dive Gear Reviews provides cross-referenced reviews assembled by an expert, making it possible to see at a glance what multiple sources said about a particular piece of scuba equipment. If one magazine loved a scuba regulator or a dive computer, but the consumers hated it, that information will be found here.
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February

Sherwood ProFile Dive Computer Review

Written by Dive Gear Reviews Editor. Comments Off on Sherwood ProFile Dive Computer Review Posted in: Between $251-$500, Dive Computers

Sherwood’s ProFile serves as its most basic dive computer design, and is a real veteran that has seen only modest upgrades over the years. The current version incorporates a Deep Stop function (automatic reminder for a safety stop on any dive exceeding 80 feet) and can compute for Nitrox mixtures of up to 50%. The digital display design has three screens and follows a simple, easy-to-follow philosophy, but the current ProFile has reduced its color-coded graphs along the side of the display to mere slivers. Although the computer has a back-lit display, some reviewers thought the display was difficult to read in deep, dark waters, and a diver should never need to point a dive light at something as critical as a dive computer. The dive computer’s algorithm is liberal, but a diver can adjust that simply by adjusting their dive plan and not pushing the tissue-loading measurement to its limits. On the plus side, the readout can switch between Imperial and Metric, the battery is of a standard consumer type, and the dive computer automatically adjusts to altitudes of up to 14,000 feet. Scuba Diving magazine considered the ProFile an excellent dive computer for beginners, and despite some of its limitations, this number cruncher has some flexibility and growth potential. The unit has a reputation for simplicity and reliability, and Sherwood implies it could be used for technical diving by describing the ProFile as reliable at 260 feet as it is at 60. It comes in wristwatch and console formats, and Sherwood makes a console with a built-in compass.

Average Price: $270 (Compact Console version)