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Welcome to Dive Gear Reviews, a comprehensive guide to scuba diving equipment. Scuba diving is an expensive pursuit, so looking up reviews for a particular article of equipment is a wise precaution before investing any hard-earned money in it. However, consumer reviews may or may not be written by an experienced diver, and magazine reviews could be suspect due to the advertising ties of the publication in question. Dive Gear Reviews provides cross-referenced reviews assembled by an expert, making it possible to see at a glance what multiple sources said about a particular piece of scuba equipment. If one magazine loved a scuba regulator or a dive computer, but the consumers hated it, that information will be found here.
09
April

Scubapro Go BCD Scuba BCD Review

Written by Dive Gear Reviews Editor. Comments Off on Scubapro Go BCD Scuba BCD Review Posted in: BCDs, Between $251-$500

Just in case the name wasn’t enough of a hint, the Go is Scubapro’s latest travel BCD, offering some improvements over older models (such as the Litehawk). Like all travel BCDs, the Go is made with compactness and low weight in mind. The L size weighs only 6 lbs, and the package is collapsible enough to fit inside a handy, mid-sized plastic bag (which Scubapro thoughtfully provides).

So far, the Go is no different than so many other travel BCDs on the market, but it’s in the details where this Scubapro BCD becomes a winner. Unlike many travel BCDs, the Go has an integrated weight system, using the buckle-and-strap locking system common to Scubapro BCDs. Mesh pockets for cargo carrying lie over the top of the weight pockets, and the BCD has three aluminum D-rings (two on the bottom of the waist, one on the left shoulder strap) plus the plastic rings on the ends of the various straps.  Grommets in the pockets allow for the attachment of dive knives, among other things. There are two tank straps, and the back padding is comfortably padding, while avoiding any stiff parts that would compromise the collapsibility of the Go BCD. Finally, the BCD’s single air cell delivers good lifting power for a BCD, with a range of 10.2 to 19.4 kg (22.5 to 42.7 lbs), depending on the size.

However, like any travel BCD, the Go has its drawbacks. Thankfully, these are all very typical of this class of BCD, and therefore should be held against the Scubapro Go if you intend to buy something more oriented towards general use. First, to achieve its light weight, the Go BCD is made from 210 denier Nylon, a relatively flimsy grade. Scubapro makes solid gear, but don’t expect robust durability to be one of the Go’s main virtues. Second, the weight pocket/cargo pocket design used in the Go BCD puts both pockets inside the same given volume, so if you use the integrated weight system, there isn’t much leftover in the cargo pocket.

That said, the Go BCD is a solid piece of travel gear. It’s straightforward, does the job and has some nice frills. Sport Diver made it a 2012 Editor’s Pick, Divernet awarded it eight stars, and the consumer commentary has been strongly positive.

Average Price: $395